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Last Station, The

Romance
Anne-Marie Duff, Christopher Plummer, Helen Mirren, James McAvoy, Kerry Condon, Paul Giamatti
Michael Hoffman
NOMINATED FOR TWO ACADEMY AWARDS:
BEST ACTRESS AND BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
 
NOMINATED FOR TWO GOLDEN GLOBES:
BEST ACTRESS AND BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
 
NOMINATED FOR TWO SAG AWARDS:
FEMALE LEAD ACTRESS AND SUPPORTING MALE ACTOR
 
NOMINATED FOR FIVE INDEPENDENT SPIRIT AWARDS:
BEST FILM, BEST DIRECTOR, BEST SCREENPLAY, BEST ACTRESS AND BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR.

After almost fifty years of marriage, the Countess Sofya, Leo Tolstoy’s devoted wife, passionate lover, muse and secretary—she’s copied out War and Peace six times…by hand!—suddenly finds her entire world turned upside down.  In the name of his newly created religion, the great Russian novelist has renounced his noble title, his property and even his family in favor of poverty, vegetarianism and even celibacy.  After she’s born him thirteen children!

When Sofya then discovers that Tolstoy’s trusted disciple, Chertkov—whom she despises—may have secretly convinced her husband to sign a new will, leaving the rights to his iconic novels to the Russian people rather than his very own family, she is consumed by righteous outrage!  This is the last straw!  Using every bit of cunning, every trick of seduction in her considerable arsenal, she fights fiercely for what she believes is rightfully hers.  The more extreme her behavior becomes, however, the more easily Chertkov is able to persuade Tolstoy of the damage she will do to his glorious legacy.   

Into this minefield wanders Tolstoy’s worshipful new assistant, the young, gullible Valentin.  In no time, he becomes a pawn, first of the scheming Chertkov and then of the wounded, vengeful Sofya as each plots to undermine the other’s gains.   Complicating Valentin’s life even further is the overwhelming passion he feels for the beautiful, spirited Masha, a free thinking adherent of Tolstoy’s new religion whose unconventional attitudes about sex and love both compel and confuse him.  Infatuated with Tolstoy’s notions of ideal love, but mystified by the Tolstoys’ rich and turbulent marriage, Valentin is ill equipped to deal with the complications of love in the real world.

A tale of two romances, one beginning, one near its end, The Last Station is a complex, funny, rich and emotional story about the difficulty of living with love and the impossibility of living without it.

Production Stills

Reviews & Buzz

The Hollywood Reporter
...Three superb performances by Helen Mirren, Christopher Plummer and James McAvoy should have Oscar handicappers drooling.

LA Times
Helen Mirren, Christopher Plummer, James McAvoy and Paul Giamatti are going to try to shake up the awards season.

Variety
...Meaty roles are acted to the hilt by a cast more than ready for the feast. Christopher Plummer and Helen Mirren shine as an aged but still passionate couple...

IndieWire
...gorgeous...and utterly accessible and entertaining.

Wall Street Journal
Literary legends come to life in Michael Hoffman's "The Last Station,"...

Screen International
Hoffmans likeable biopic walks a nice edge between drama and comedy, in line with its subject matter...

LA Times
Last Station Nominated for Five Independent Spirit Awards!

Variety
Helen Mirren to receive the 21st Palm Springs International Film Festivals Career Achievement Award

Newsweek
James McAvoy, Helen Mirren, and Christopher Plummer offer a grand display of acting fireworks in The Last Station, writer-director Michael Hoffman's juicy account of the fraught final year of Count Leo Tolstoy's life.

Entertainment Weekly
a grandly entertaining historical drama about the final year of the great Russian writer's life.

Rolling Stone
The incomparable Mirren is simply astounding. And Plummer, red-faced with embarrassment at his own desire for his wife after all these years, is her match.

USA Today
Every second Helen Mirren is on-screen in The Last Station is a study in peerless talent.

Los Angeles Times
Under the accomplished direction of Michael Hoffmanthe film's centerpiece is the spectacular back and forth between Christopher Plummer as the great man, a count as well as a writer, and Helen Mirren as Sofya, his wife of 48 years and always a force to be reckoned with.

New York Post
Helen Mirren outdoes even her Oscar-winning performance in The Queen with her tour de force as Countess Sofya Tolstoy in Michael Hoffman's delightful The Last Station.

The New Yorker
this production...is like a great night at the theatrethe two performing demons go at each other full tilt and produce scenes of Shakespearean affection, chagrin, and rage.

Golden Globe Nominations!
TWO GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINATIONS -- HELEN MIRREN, BEST ACTRESS AND CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER, BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

The Women on the Web
As for Miss Mirren, she is a miracle...She is a force of nature, like a hurricane, but one that never loses its power quite the opposite! She is a perfect, eternal storm of genius.

KTLA
Watch James McAvoy on LA's KTLA Morning Show!